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Your prettiest fansite dedicted to actress and humanitarian Emma Watson. Known for her role as Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter film series, Emma has since graduated to new and exciting roles, including Ballet Shoes, The Bling Ring, The Perks of Being a Wallflower and Noah. With upcoming projects including Disney's live-action remake of Beauty and the Beast, we aim to bring you the latest news & images relating to Emma's acting career, and strive to remain 100% gossip-and-paparazzi-free. Make sure to bookmark us, and check back regularly for your daily dose of our favorite British actress!
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Archive for the ‘Press’ Category
Neide   —   Press

The world took a turn the day George Floyd was murdered by a police officer, in the United States. No more would we accept police violence against black people. Black Lives Matter, and for white people that means educating ourselves on the black community and their history. You can do it by watching documentaries, television series, listening to podcasts, and by reading books. It’s not a secret that Emma Watson is a bookworm, having her own book club. As Emma posts on her Instagram account many ways we can help – through petitions, donations, supporting businesses owned by black people, she also shares how we can educate ourselves, become better allies and help on the fight against racism. Vogue UK has published an article, taken from Emma’s book recommendations post, with information on each of the books mentioned. You can learn about them below.

In a bid to encourage people to educate themselves about systemic racism, Emma Watson has shared her current reading list on Instagram. After acknowledging the ways in which she, as a white person, has benefited from white supremacy in an earlier statement on social media, the actor encouraged her 57 million followers to join her in picking up books by authors including Ta-Nehisi Coates and David Olusoga.

“Self-education is an essential part of any anti-racist journey, and reading has always been a huge part of my personal learning,” Watson wrote, along side a painting by Natalie Lauren Sims. “In 2016, I started @oursharedshelf, a bookclub to create conversations around intersectionality, feminism and equal rights and to profile feminist writers,” she continued. “Many of the writers and books we featured over the years are relevant to anyone wanting to understand that the struggle for racial justice has been a long one, that ALL Black Lives Matter and women’s voices are a vital part of any movement for change. Alice Walker, Bell Hooks, Maya Angelou, Roxane Gay, Reni Eddo-Lodge, Angie Thomas, Audre Lorde, Brittney Cooper, and Toni Morrison are just some of the authors we featured and which I urge you to check out if you haven’t already.⁣”

More recently, Watson has been working her way through multiple reads by people of colour. “I hope you’ll pick these up and read along with me,” she wrote.

Here, British Vogue takes a closer look at her educational reading list.

The Wretched of the Earth by Frantz Fanon⁣
Published in 1961 by psychiatrist Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth made him the leading anti-colonialist thinker of the 20th Century. Writing about the trauma of colonisation, Fanon’s text inspired anti-colonial movements thanks to its analysis of race, violence, class and culture in a fight for freedom.

We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates
Published in 2018, ⁣Coates’s book is essential reading in understanding race in America today. We Were Eight Years in Power looks at Barack Obama’s presidency and Trump’s thereafter, by delving into the Black Lives Matter movement and the rise of white supremacy.
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Neide   —   Press

Emma recently had the opportunity to interview Valerie Hudson, author of “Sex and World Peace”. If you follow Emma on instagram, you’ll recognize this book as the one she highlight on International Women’s Day, on March 8. It’s also “Our Shared Shelf”, Emma’s book club that you can join as long you have a goodreads account, pick for April! Teen Vogue teamed up with Emma for this interview, that you can read below!

It probably takes a lot for Emma Watson to be starstruck, but that’s how the iconic Little Women and Harry Potter actor says she felt when she spoke to Texas A&M professor and author Valerie Hudson.

The two recently hopped on a call to discuss Hudson’s book, Sex and World Peace, which Watson received a copy of from Gloria Steinem and which she highlighted on her Instagram for International Women’s Day. They ended up having a sprawling conversation on everything from the power of being happily single to Watson’s work with the United Nations Women HeForShe campaign to why men just don’t listen to women enough.

Teen Vogue published their conversation, below.

Emma Watson: This is so cool. I’m starstruck!

Valerie Hudson: I sort of feel the same way. One of my daughters is currently reading the Harry Potter series, so every time she finishes a book, we get to see the movie, and of course, you know, you are their heroine.

EW: Ah, I love that. You are such a badass. Your book, it exploded my brain — I think that’s the most accurate way that I can put it! What prompted you to write it?

VH: When I went to graduate school in international affairs, you could have taken my entire coursework and never known there were women on Earth. It was that woman-less.… The idea that national security could have something to do with women would have seemed ludicrous, absolutely ludicrous. And I was a product of that. And it really wasn’t until my eyes began to open, I began to ask questions. I began to read things that had hints.

One of the things you discover very quickly is that if you say, ‘I think national security has something to do with women’, people say, ‘Oh, you know, come back when you’ve got some data; don’t tell us these stories.’ It’s too dismissible without data. That’s why we took the data route.
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Gabby   —   Photoshoots Press

Emma is on the cover of the December issue of British Vogue! The beautiful photoshoot was shot by Alasdair McLellan, who’s worked with Emma many times before. This is a big contribution to the promotion of the movie “Little Women“, which stars Emma, Saoirse Ronan, Florence Pugh and Eliza Scanlen, and is currently set to premiere at Christmas. Our gallery has been updated with images from the issue!

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The age of influence, it’s said, is upon us. Whether on the front row or on the front benches – or simply leaning over our smartphones – we have more eyes on each other than at any time in history. As is also often said these days, it’s a lot.

Of course, in the fashion industry and across social media, the concept of an “influencer” has evolved in a few short years into one that we all fully understand. Many influencers are now stars in their own right, while millions more around the globe, armed with a new handbag and a winning filter, continue to strive for clicks and likes. It’s an important sea change, but I do sometimes wonder how many are doing anything truly useful with this modern superpower.

Emma Watson is one woman getting it right. Since she was cast as Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter franchise 20 years ago (aged just nine), she has been one of the most recognisable faces on the planet. Famous in practically every corner of the world, she accumulated influence the old-fashioned way; coming of age in the digital era means she now finds herself with a cross-platform following of over 100 million engaged and devoted fans.

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Gabby   —   Press
(Scans) Empire – October
(September 22, 2019)

Hello everyone! Our gallery has been updated with two scans from the October issue of Empire magazine, which features an article about the movie Little Women, starred by Emma, Saoirse Ronan, Florence Pugh and Eliza Scanlen.

saoirse ronan, emma watson, florence pugh, eliza scanlen, little womensaoirse ronan, emma watson, florence pugh, eliza scanlen, little women

Gabby   —   Photoshoots Press
Emma covers Vogue Australia
(February 20, 2018)

Emma is the guest editor (and the cover) of the March issue of Vogue Australia! We had expected not to get any news like this for a loooong time, seeing as there haven’t been any movie announcements lately… what a lovely surprise! The issue features a brand new photoshoot by Peter Lindbergh, and it goes on sale on February 26. We have updated our gallery with the beautiful photos, and you can read an excerpt of the article below.

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After a year dominated by an alarming newsfeed, it seems we have hit a turning point in 2018. Silenced voices are becoming amplified and media outlets are shining a spotlight on the people and groups challenging for change. The pages to follow in this issue, Designing the Future, is a part of that change.

The word ‘change’ can be intimidating, riddled with expectation of outcomes and fear of failure. So I want to propose something to you: when steering a boat, a captain can shift the wheel one degree and it drastically changes the course of the boat. I would like to challenge you, after reading this issue, to make a one-degree shift, because a small change can make a huge difference.

Thank you, Vogue Australia, for allowing me this platform to share stories and movements I care about. Thank you, Peter Lindbergh, for your careful eye and such a joyous shoot. Thank you to all the collaborators for sharing your voice and your self. And lastly, thank you to anyone picking up this issue and reading it. You are the biggest piece to the puzzle of our global wellbeing. Join me in a one-degree shift!

Neide   —   Press

Hello Emma fans! As you know, Emma has her own book club named “Our Shared Shelf” which you can join if you happen to have a goodsread account. She most recently interviewed Margaret Atwood, the author of The Handmaid’s Tale, which has been recently turned into a television show, not to mention it was Emma’s pick for May/June! Entertainment Weekly teamed up with Emma for this interview, and you can read the interview bellow! In our gallery you will also find scans from the issue.

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Many celebrities have book clubs, but none share the clout of Emma Watson’s “Our Shared Shelf,” which has picked up nearly 200,000 members since it launched on Goodreads in 2016. As Watson wrote when she made The Handmaid’s Tale her May/June selection, “It is a book that has never stopped fascinating readers because it articulates so vividly what it feels like for a woman to lose power over her own body.” Thanks to the recent Hulu series, Atwood’s 1985 dystopian novel has again soared to the top of the best-seller lists. Watson called up Atwood to discuss.

Watson: You were living in West Berlin when you wrote The Handmaid’s Tale in 1984; it was before the wall came down. Was being in a divided city a big influence on the novel or had you been thinking about it before you arrived in Berlin? I’d love to know how the novel came about.

Atwood: I had been thinking about it before I’d arrived, and at that time — when I was in West Berlin—I also visited Czechoslovakia and East Germany and Poland. They weren’t revelations, because being as old as I am I knew about life behind the Iron Curtain, but it was very interesting to be right inside, to sense the atmosphere. East Germany was the most repressed, Czechoslovakia the second, and Poland was relatively wide open, which explains why Poland was where the Cold War wall first cracked. So it was very interesting to be there, but it wasn’t the primary inspiration.

Watson: What was the inspiration, if you don’t mind me asking?

Atwood: There were three inspirations. First, what right wing people were already saying in 1980. They were saying the kinds of things they’re now doing, but at that time they didn’t have the power to do them. I believe that people who say those kinds of things will do those things if and when they get power: They’re not just funning around. So that was one of the inspirations. If you’re going to make women go back into the home, how are you going to do that? If America were to become a totalitarian state, what would that state look like? What would its aims be? What sort of excuse would it use for its atrocities? Because they all have an excuse of some kind. It would not be Communism in the United States; it would have undoubtedly been some sort of religious ideology—which it now is. By the way, that’s not an “anti religion” statement. Recently, someone said, “Religion doesn’t radicalize people, people radicalize religion.” So you can use any religion as an excuse for being repressive, and you can use any religion as an excuse for resisting repression; it works both ways, as it does in the book. So that was one set of inspirations.

The second inspiration was historical. The 17th-century foundation of America was not, “Let’s have a democracy.” It was “Let’s have a theocracy,” which was what they established in the New England states, such as Massachusetts. Harvard­—in and around which the novel is set —began as a theological seminary in the 17th century, and the Puritans excluded anybody who didn’t believe in their theology.

The third inspiration was simply my reading of speculative fiction and sci-fi, especially that of the ’30’s, ’40’s, and ’50’s, and my desire to give the form a try. Most of the ones I’d read had been written by men and had male protagonists, and I wanted to flip that and see what such a thing would look like if it were told from the point of view of a female narrator. It’s not that those earlier books didn’t have women in them, and not that women didn’t play important parts; it’s that they were not the narrators.
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