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Your prettiest fansite dedicted to actress and humanitarian Emma Watson. Known for her role as Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter film series, Emma has since graduated to new and exciting roles, including Ballet Shoes, The Bling Ring, The Perks of Being a Wallflower and Noah. With upcoming projects including Disney's live-action remake of Beauty and the Beast, we aim to bring you the latest news & images relating to Emma's acting career, and strive to remain 100% gossip-and-paparazzi-free. Make sure to bookmark us, and check back regularly for your daily dose of our favorite British actress!
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Archive for the ‘Press’ Category
Gabby   —   Photoshoots Press
Emma covers Vogue Australia
(February 20, 2018)

Emma is the guest editor (and the cover) of the March issue of Vogue Australia! We had expected not to get any news like this for a loooong time, seeing as there haven’t been any movie announcements lately… what a lovely surprise! The issue features a brand new photoshoot by Peter Lindbergh, and it goes on sale on February 26. We have updated our gallery with the beautiful photos, and you can read an excerpt of the article below.

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After a year dominated by an alarming newsfeed, it seems we have hit a turning point in 2018. Silenced voices are becoming amplified and media outlets are shining a spotlight on the people and groups challenging for change. The pages to follow in this issue, Designing the Future, is a part of that change.

The word ‘change’ can be intimidating, riddled with expectation of outcomes and fear of failure. So I want to propose something to you: when steering a boat, a captain can shift the wheel one degree and it drastically changes the course of the boat. I would like to challenge you, after reading this issue, to make a one-degree shift, because a small change can make a huge difference.

Thank you, Vogue Australia, for allowing me this platform to share stories and movements I care about. Thank you, Peter Lindbergh, for your careful eye and such a joyous shoot. Thank you to all the collaborators for sharing your voice and your self. And lastly, thank you to anyone picking up this issue and reading it. You are the biggest piece to the puzzle of our global wellbeing. Join me in a one-degree shift!

Neide   —   Press

Hello Emma fans! As you know, Emma has her own book club named “Our Shared Shelf” which you can join if you happen to have a goodsread account. She most recently interviewed Margaret Atwood, the author of The Handmaid’s Tale, which has been recently turned into a television show, not to mention it was Emma’s pick for May/June! Entertainment Weekly teamed up with Emma for this interview, and you can read the interview bellow! In our gallery you will also find scans from the issue.

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Many celebrities have book clubs, but none share the clout of Emma Watson’s “Our Shared Shelf,” which has picked up nearly 200,000 members since it launched on Goodreads in 2016. As Watson wrote when she made The Handmaid’s Tale her May/June selection, “It is a book that has never stopped fascinating readers because it articulates so vividly what it feels like for a woman to lose power over her own body.” Thanks to the recent Hulu series, Atwood’s 1985 dystopian novel has again soared to the top of the best-seller lists. Watson called up Atwood to discuss.

Watson: You were living in West Berlin when you wrote The Handmaid’s Tale in 1984; it was before the wall came down. Was being in a divided city a big influence on the novel or had you been thinking about it before you arrived in Berlin? I’d love to know how the novel came about.

Atwood: I had been thinking about it before I’d arrived, and at that time — when I was in West Berlin—I also visited Czechoslovakia and East Germany and Poland. They weren’t revelations, because being as old as I am I knew about life behind the Iron Curtain, but it was very interesting to be right inside, to sense the atmosphere. East Germany was the most repressed, Czechoslovakia the second, and Poland was relatively wide open, which explains why Poland was where the Cold War wall first cracked. So it was very interesting to be there, but it wasn’t the primary inspiration.

Watson: What was the inspiration, if you don’t mind me asking?

Atwood: There were three inspirations. First, what right wing people were already saying in 1980. They were saying the kinds of things they’re now doing, but at that time they didn’t have the power to do them. I believe that people who say those kinds of things will do those things if and when they get power: They’re not just funning around. So that was one of the inspirations. If you’re going to make women go back into the home, how are you going to do that? If America were to become a totalitarian state, what would that state look like? What would its aims be? What sort of excuse would it use for its atrocities? Because they all have an excuse of some kind. It would not be Communism in the United States; it would have undoubtedly been some sort of religious ideology—which it now is. By the way, that’s not an “anti religion” statement. Recently, someone said, “Religion doesn’t radicalize people, people radicalize religion.” So you can use any religion as an excuse for being repressive, and you can use any religion as an excuse for resisting repression; it works both ways, as it does in the book. So that was one set of inspirations.

The second inspiration was historical. The 17th-century foundation of America was not, “Let’s have a democracy.” It was “Let’s have a theocracy,” which was what they established in the New England states, such as Massachusetts. Harvard­—in and around which the novel is set —began as a theological seminary in the 17th century, and the Puritans excluded anybody who didn’t believe in their theology.

The third inspiration was simply my reading of speculative fiction and sci-fi, especially that of the ’30’s, ’40’s, and ’50’s, and my desire to give the form a try. Most of the ones I’d read had been written by men and had male protagonists, and I wanted to flip that and see what such a thing would look like if it were told from the point of view of a female narrator. It’s not that those earlier books didn’t have women in them, and not that women didn’t play important parts; it’s that they were not the narrators.
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Gabby   —   Press Videos

While in Paris for the promotion of The Circle, Emma was interviewed by Juliette Delacroix for TF1, and the video was broadcasted live on Facebook. Thanks to Totally Emma Watson on Youtube, we can now share the video with you. Emma sort of summarizes the film’s plot in the best way she can without giving too much away, and says that the subject of how social media influences our lives and what it could become in the future is a “fascinating thing to go and see and talk about”.

Neide   —   Photoshoots Press

Hello Emma fans! Emma is on the cover of the May issue of Interview magazine, looking absolutely beautiful, and we have added outtakes along with the cover to our gallery! Bellow you will also find a very interesting interview, as Emma was interviewed by Jessica Chastain and the duo spoke about fashion, freedom and much more. Surely a must read!

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It’s been almost six years since the release of the last Harry Potter film, and still it can be difficult for people to separate Emma Watson from Hermione Granger, the character she played in all eight installments of the hit franchise, from the time she was 11 until she was 21. Maybe there’s a reason for this. In the “fantasy” that she says became her life and the lives of her co-stars, Watson, like Hermione, has displayed unbridled passion, natural talent, and—thank goodness for us—a defiant determination to do things her way.

Whether that has meant taking time away from a white-hot film career to pursue a degree from Brown University or addressing the issue of gender inequality at the U.N. General Assembly, in her role as a U.N. Women Goodwill Ambassador, Watson has been steadfast in her authenticity. And if she’s made some mistakes along the way, as she insists she has, they haven’t been onscreen for us to see—certainly not in her two stunning post-Potter films The Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012) and The Bling Ring (2013), which gave us tiny glimpses of her future in film.

That future is now here. In March, Watson played Belle in Disney’s live-action reboot of Beauty and the Beast, and she can currently be seen opposite Tom Hanks in the surveillance thriller The Circle, based on the novel by Dave Eggers. If the former was a return to the magical universe in which we first met her, the latter has given Watson the welcome opportunity to question how we live today, in the real world. As she tells her friend, the two-time Oscar-nominated actress Jessica Chastain, the struggle to live up to her onscreen persona—to become a spokesperson, a role model, for an entire generation of girls—might all be worth it if she can still be herself.

JESSICA CHASTAIN: Hi, honey. Where are you right now?

EMMA WATSON: I’m thrilled that you asked, because I didn’t want things to get weird. I’m in the bath. In Paris. I didn’t want you to hear swishing water and be like, “Uh, what are you doing?” I’m very relaxed. Where are you?

CHASTAIN: I am in a hotel room. There are bags of hair extensions and makeup and clothes everywhere.

WATSON: As long as there’s a clear line across the floor so that you can actually get into bed at night, you’re good.
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Gabby   —   Humanitarian Work Press

Emma was honored by Vanity Fair UK for her humanitarian work! She was photographed at the One Young World summit in Ottawa, along important international figures such as David Jones, Mary Robinson, Justin Trudeau and Kofi Annan. A couple of images from the event, taken by Jason Schmidt at the One Young World summit in Ottawa, are featured in the April issue of the magazine. It included 1,300 young leaders from 196 countries, and was focused on “generating innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing issues.” The Emma Watson Scholarship was announced at this year’s event, for which “outstanding work in advancing gender equality across the globe” will be rewarded.

Gabby   —   Press

Emma has been interviewing author Eve Ensler for Elle UK this week, and today’s piece is the last one from the series. In this one, Emma speaks to Eve on the ideological, and literal, assaults on women’s vaginas – from the Presidency down through to the ranks to everyday life. They assert solidarity with transgender women and discuss the next stage of the new women’s Resistance.

PART 4. “The next stage of the women’s uprising is upon us.”

Emma Watson: I have a question from another one of my Book Club members, Sierra, who says: “As an intersectional feminist, how do you balance retaking ownership and pride in vaginas whilst still being an ally for trans women? Not a critique, just something I’ve been wondering recently due to the backlash after some of the Women’s March defined their womanhood by their vagina.”

Eve Ensler: This is what I am going to say: it’s not either/or.

I know many women, for example, transgender women, who were very happy in the march and see themselves as very connected to those Pussy hats.

I know other transgender women who feel like being vagina-focused is exclusionary. But what I would say this: there are three billion women in the world who have vaginas. One out of three of them are being raped or battered.

I think we have to talk about vaginas now.

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